Tour of Madisonville

Up until the time of the Civil War, Madisonville was a rural and mostly-white community. Immediately after the Civil War, however, Madisonville became home to an influx of African Americans, at first coming mostly from Kentucky. Since that time, Madisonville has had a strong tradition of racial integration.

To get to Amy Avenue, you drive to the eastern edge of Madisonville, to 6835 East Fork Avenue. Then look north. A street sign saying “Amy Avenue” is still in place. There’s a chain across the old road, and a “no trespassing” sign. The roadbed climbs steeply north through the woods. On both sides, occasionally visible among the honeysuckle, there are low retaining walls, steps, and house…
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The Corsica Hollow neighborhood – also known as Dunbar – was an early, African American community on the east edge of Madisonville. This community no longer exists. In the 1990’s, the City of Cincinnati used the right of eminent domain to seize all of the houses and land, tore down the houses, and re-zoned the area for commercial and industrial use.
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In 1905, the Ohio State Commissioner of Education reported on the high school at Madisonville, Ohio, noting that school principal Jennie M. Bryan had four teachers, five classrooms, 140 students, a good library, and excellent teaching apparatus. This is remarkable because Jennie M. Bryan was Black, while the teachers she supervised, and and most of the students, were white. For an African-American…
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The United American Cemetery, founded in 1883, was originally called the United Colored Cemetery. It was established by the United Colored American Association (UCAA), which had previously, in 1848, founded a cemetery in Avondale. But in 1880, a group of powerful, white property-owners in Avondale went to the Ohio statehouse to lobby for a bill that would give the Avondale board of health the…
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